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Charles J. Lockwood, MD, MHCM
Dr. Lockwood, Editor-in-Chief, is Dean of the Morsani College of Medicine and Senior Vice President of USF Health, University of South Florida, Tampa. He can be reached at [email protected]
Ob/gyns should join the fight against quiet killer
Cardiovascular problems can complicate pregnancy, and pregnancy can reveal cardiovascular risks.
Professional liability reform
We should double down on federal tort reform efforts and expand state programs to locales where basic reforms have been stymied by the trial lawyer lobby. Simultaneously, we should study non-traditional approaches.
ACOG Guidelines: Management of Late-Term and Postterm Pregnancies
A commentary on Practice Bulletin Number 146 by the Editor-in-Chief of Contemporary OB/GYN.
Updates on neonatal encephalopathy and cerebral palsy
A new report shows that monitoring and early intervention may help reduce adverse outcomes and malpractice claims.
Editorial | Graduate medical education at the crossroads
If you are like me, you had no idea who provided the money to pay your salary as a resident. I just assumed it was my hospital. But the federal government spends more than $15 billion per year on residency and fellowship training, and many are asking why physicians deserve this special largesse denied other professionals.
Whither the annual bimanual pelvic examination?
The ACP’s Clinical Guideline advising against pelvic examinations for the detection of pathological conditions in asymptomatic, nonpregnant, adult women is unfounded, ill timed, and ill considered.
Neonatal brachial plexus palsy: Is prevention possible?
A thorough ACOG task force report confirms that NBPP is difficult to predict and prevent.
Cell-free DNA testing: Preferred for detection of fetal aneuploidy
Cell-free DNA testing: Preferred for detection of fetal aneuploidy
Invasive prenatal diagnosis may soon be completely replaced by noninvasive assessment of maternal plasma cell-free DNA.
It’s a new era in anticoagulant therapy
A review of the latest agents and strategies for treating venous thromboembolic events (VTE) in both pregnant and nonpregnant women.
What do ob/gyns need to know about the new healthcare exchanges?
There's both good news and bad. More patients will be covered, but you may see fewer of them.

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