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Mary Beth Nierengarten, MA
Making it easier to prevent ear infections in children
Results of a new study show the feasibility and efficacy of preventing otitis media (OM), and potentially treat OM recurrence, through the simple use of a Band-Aid to deliver a vaccine targeted at one of the most common pathogens responsible for OM.
Novel antimicrobial shows promise for children with AOM
Children with acute otitis media (AOM) are routinely and successfully treated with antimicrobials, with data showing that the combination of amoxicillin-clavulanate (A/C) to treat AOM in children aged younger than 3 years is associated with more favorable outcomes than placebo.
When losing weight leads to eating disorders
Eating disorders often begin when an adolescent tries to lose weight. New AAP guidance provides tools to address the unhealthy eating behaviors that put teens at risk.
Cutting edge topics in 2017
ACOG conference attendees who want a glimpse of current and trending issues in the specialty will want to attend the session “Cutting Edge Topics in Ob-Gyn." The session offers overviews by various academic societies in different subspecialties that highlight evolving and emerging evidence of interest to practicing clinicians.
Pearls and pitfalls of genetic screening/testing
Navigation of the complex landscape of genetic prenatal screening and testing and ways to improve communication with patients about often inherently uncertain findings are the focus of the ACOG session, “Pearls & Pitfalls: Genetic Screening/Testing.
Functional constipation: A guideline review
Functional constipation in children is no news to pediatricians. What may be news is that recommendations on how to diagnose and treat this common malady keep evolving as more evidence becomes available.
Bacteremia in infants: Time for a new approach?
Bacteremia is now a rare event in previously healthy children aged 3 to 36 months because of the introduction of routine immunization with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV).
Choice of needle size when vaccinating children
Among concerns with administering these multiple and frequent immunizations in young children are the potential pain and adverse effects associated with injections. Along with inducing pain in some children, the early negative experience of needle-related procedures can interfere with adherence to immunization schedules and create long-lasting effects of anxiety and stress around needle-related procedures that remain into adulthood.
Allergy questionnaire helps determine true penicillin allergy in children
Although penicillin allergy is the most commonly reported medication allergy in children, the true incidence of this allergy in children is low with data suggesting that the large numbers of adverse drug reactions reported by parents as signs of an allergic reaction, such as rash or diarrhea associated with antibiotics, may not be consistent with a true allergic reaction.
Guidelines for life after LEAP
As the number of infants and children developing peanut allergy continues to grow, so does the need for pediatricians and other primary care providers to understand current recommendations on how best to prevent this allergy.

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