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Detecting abnormalities, documenting optionsA California woman was 35-years-old when she delivered an infant with severe Down's syndrome and then sued all those involved with the prenatal care and alleged that both physicians were told the parents wanted all available testing because of a family history of birth defects. What's the verdict? Plus more cases.
Is federal medical liability reform possible?Over the past few years, progress has clearly been made with regard to the professional liability crisis.
Inexpensive generic prevents bleeding deaths after childbirthAn inexpensive generic drug has been found to prevent hemorrhaging in women after childbirth.
WHI data shed light on risks of long-term bisphosphonate useAnalysis of data from the Women’s Health Initiative study adds to concerns about potential risks of long-term use of bisphosphonates in elderly women.
Bleeding disorders: When to worry, how to helpStudies have shown that 1 in 5 women who consult their doctor for heavy or prolonged bleeding during their periods actually have an underlying bleeding disorder.
ACOG releases new study on ob/gyn workforceWork-life integration, lower job satisfaction, increasing subspecialization, and concerns about income and professional liability are among the issues shaping the ob/gyn workforce and how they practice, according to a new report from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).
Patient Handout: Pictorial blood assessment chartA handout to give patients when assessing them for heavy menstrual bleeding.
ACOG on Prenatal diagnostic testing for genetic disordersExpert commentary on Practice Bulletin No. 162: Prenatal Diagnostic Testing for Genetic Disorders.
The microbiome in prematurity: Key messages from emerging sciencePTB can be readily separated into spontaneous and indicated PTB, and, thus, treatment or prevention for one might be counterproductive for the other.
Using ultrasound to recognize fetal anomalies: Part 1Like much of medicine, ultrasound diagnosis of fetal anomalies is both a science and an art. Part 1 of this article will detail, within the text and with images, the anomalies that should not be missed when performing ultrasound during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy.
Fetal anomalies on ultrasound in the first trimesterA collection of ultrasounds showing fetal anomalies during the first trimester of pregnancy.
Second trimester ultrasounds of fetal anomalies in the head and chestA collection of ultrasounds showing fetal anomalies in the brain/skull, face, neck, chest, and heart.
Second trimester ultrasounds of fetal anomalies in the abdomen, spine, genitourinary, and extremitiesA collection of ultrasounds for fetal anomalies in abdominal structures, genitourinary structures, spine, and extremities.
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